Yet another ancient Greek city found, this time on the Turkish coast

Last week, we talked about the discoveries of two Greek settlements, one in Crimea and the other pertaining to the lost city of Tenea. This time around, archaeologists have identified yet another ancient Greek city and it is believed to be around 2,700-years old. Discovered in Turkey’s western Çanakkale province, the settlement Limnai (not be confused with its Thracian and Spartan counterparts) was already known to have existed – discerned from ancient sources. However, this is the very first time that archaeologists have been able to locate it, with the fascinating feat being achieved by the researchers at Turkey’s Çanakkale Onsekiz Mart University (ÇOMÜ).

Interestingly enough, the excavation project in itself was started back in 2015 in the proximate Salt Lake plain. The focus was later shifted to the Beşyol plain where the settlement was ultimately discovered. According to ÇOMÜ’s Ancient History Department Assoc. Prof. Dr. Reyhan Körpe –

Only pieces of bowls, pottery and tiles can be seen on the surface since the architectural remnants of the city are underground. However, these pieces give us information about the field the city covered, as well as when the city was established and when it was deserted.

Pertaining to this history, the city, like many others in Anatolia, was established by the Ionian settlers in the 7th century BC. The settlement was founded on the western coast of Asia Minor in Gallipoli. Limited archaeological evidence suggests that Limnai possibly thrived as one of the commercially important ports in the Gallipoli area.

Quite intriguingly, this ancient city is actually the 5th of its kind that has been discovered in the proximate area. Suffice it to say, the archaeologists are looking forth to find even more ‘lost’ settlements that could be uncovered in the historically rich (and strategically important) Gallipoli peninsula.

Source: DailySabah 

Image Credits: AA

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About the Author

Dattatreya Mandal
Dattatreya Mandal has a bachelor's degree in Architecture (and associated History of Architecture) and a fervent interest in History. Formerly, one of the co-owners of an online architectural digest, he is currently the founder/editor of Realmofhistory.com. The latter is envisaged as an online compendium that mirrors his enthusiasm for ancient history, military, mythology, and historical evolution of architecture.
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